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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

1 edition of Aeolian dust experiment on climate impact found in the catalog.

Aeolian dust experiment on climate impact

Aeolian dust experiment on climate impact

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Published by Meteorological Society of Japan in Tokyo, Japan .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dust.,
  • Climatic changes.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesJournal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. v. 83 (Supplement A)
    Statementedited by: K. Yamazaki ... [et al.].
    ContributionsYamakazi, K., Nihon Kishō Gakkai.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 346 p. :
    Number of Pages346
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17725362M

    Dust emission caused by wind erosion has received considerable attention because of its far-reaching effects on ecosystems, including the loss of nutrients and water-holding capacity from source areas, changes to climate and global energy balance in areas where dust is entrained in the atmosphere, fertilization of terrestrial and marine ecosystems, in addition to decreases in .   New satellite data shows how Sahara dust in the wind makes it to the Amazon, ensuring its survival. Support Our Work. Researching and reporting the science and impacts of climate change.

    Taking a global perspective, this book provides a concise overview of drylands, including their physical, biological, temporal, and human components. Examines the physical systems occurring in desert environments, including climate, hydrology, past and present lakes, weathering, hillslopes, geomorphic surfaces, water as a geomorphic agent, and aeolian processes Offers . Aeolian landscapes in continental and coastal contexts are potentially significant archives of Quaternary climatic and environmental changes at local to continental scales. They have been affected through the Quaternary by the impacts of climate change and human agency on process domains, sediment availability and other factors.

    Aeolian desertification is a form of land degradation process that is mainly caused by climate change and irresponsible human activities in arid, semiarid, and some sub-humid regions (Zheng et .   For GHCN data, anomalies are relative to GHCN data for For model experiments, anomalies are relative to the SST forcing () experiment. View larger image. To test the effect of atmospheric dust, we ran the GISS climate model with observed SSTs for , with and without the presence of a dust source over the Great Plains.


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Aeolian dust experiment on climate impact Download PDF EPUB FB2

With this background, the Japan–China joint project, Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate impact (ADEC) was initiated in April (Mikami et al., ).The five-year project consisted of field experiments conducted from March to Marchincluding three intensive observation periods in, and Cited by:   [IPCC, ].

This is because the understanding and the model representations of dust entrainment, spatial and temporal distribution of dust, and optical properties of dust particles are not so accurate. Based on this background, Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact (ADEC) was started in April as a Japan-Sino Joint : M.

Mikami. To investigate the impact of aeolian dust on the climate, Japan-China joint project (Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate impact: ADEC) started in April with a five-year plan. We collected aeolian dust samples using high volume air sampler and Andersen-type low volume air sampler at China stations (Beijing, Hofei and Qingdao) and Japanese.

The First Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact Workshop, - Japan and China Joint Project, Tokyo, Japan, Januarysponsored by the Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan. Google ScholarCited by:   The Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact (ADEC) was initiated in April as a joint five-year Japan-China project.

The goal was to understand the impact of aeolian dust on climate via radiative forcing (RF). Field experiments and numerical simulations were conducted from the source regions in northwestern China to the downwind region in Cited by: The Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact (ADEC) was initiated in April as a joint five-year Japan–China project.

The goal was to understand the impact of aeolian dust on climate. Aeolian dust is dependent on erosivity (i.e., wind speed) and erodibility (i.e., land surface conditions). The effect of erodibility on dust occurrence remains poorly understood.

In this study, we proposed a composite erodibility index (dust occurrence ratio, DOR) and examined its interannual variation at a typical steppe site (Abaga-Qi) in Xilingol Grassland, China, during.

The dual, and competing, roles of dust as CCN and IN cloud our understanding of the global impact of dust on the climate (Mahowald and Kiehl, ). Increases in dust acting as CCN would increase cloud albedo and suppress precipitation in warm, stratiform clouds (Rosenfeld et al., ), although the global impact of dust in this role is unknown.

Aeolian dust is a key aspect of the climate system. Dust can modify the Earth's energy budget, provide long‐range transport of nutrients, and influence land surface processes via erosion.

Consequently, effective modeling of the climate system, particularly at regional scales, requires a reasonably accurate representation of dust emission. Aeolian processes, also spelled eolian, pertain to wind activity in the study of geology and weather and specifically to the wind's ability to shape the surface of the Earth (or other planets).Winds may erode, transport, and deposit materials and are effective agents in regions with sparse vegetation, a lack of soil moisture and a large supply of unconsolidated sediments.

Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan. Ser. II Vol. 83A () Special Issue: ADEC -Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact- P A major limitation in evaluating aeolian dust in climate models is the lack of high‐quality and long‐term measurements of dust.

Satellite retrievals from which a dust concentration can be derived extend back to approximatelybut these data have uncertainties [ Engelstaedter and Washington, ; Evan and Mukhopadhyay, ]. Greenhouse gases might be the main culprits in the rapid warming of our planet, but particles in the air also play a part.

Soot, dust, sulfate and other aerosols can both cool the atmosphere and. The main research tasks are characterized by cooperation between theoretical and experimental approaches.

The dust experiments are conducted with the BGU wind-tunnels that generate high-resolution data (dust fluxes, masses and concentrations, PM10 and PM, sediment-supply potential, aeolian connectivity). Aeolian dust is a key aspect of the climate system.

Dust can modify the Earth's energy budget, provide long-range transport of nutrients, and influence land surface processes via erosion. Consequently, effective modeling of the climate system, particularly at regional scales, requires a reasonably accurate representation of dust emission.

Profiles of sulphate fluxes over the pastyears from an Antarctic ice core show that, whereas the flux of sulphate-adhered dust has remained almost constant, that of sulphate salts. The direct radiative impact of a dust outbreak over West Africa, for example, reduced net downward shortwave flux at the surface by W.m-2 (Milton et al ) while numerical simulations demonstrate a strong influence of North African dust on tropic-wide precipitation (in the Sahel, approaching the amplitude of the long-term drought) as well.

Geosciences, an international, peer-reviewed Open Access journal. Dear Colleagues, This Special Issue is dedicated to recent progress in our understanding of aeolian processes—the emission, transport and deposition of dust and sand particles by wind—and the concatenated geomorphology of Earth and extra-terrestrial environments.

Hui Yang, Changxing Shi, Spatial and temporal variations of aeolian sediment input to the tributaries (the Ten Kongduis) of the upper Yellow River, Aeolian Research, /, 30, (), (). The Arctic is characterised by strangely eroded rocks, special wind-formed lakes, sand dunes and loess deposits that owe their formation to aeolian processes controlled by snow cover and frost formation.

Wind as a Geomorphic Agent in Cold Climates presents a detailed description and explanation of these wind-generated polar landforms, both modern-day and.

The session on environmental impacts of aeolian processes and erosion control included presentations on dust produced by agricultural operations with regards to their effects (Zhao et al.) and control mechanisms (Hagen’s keynote), while the keynote presentation by Claiborn et al.

considered to what extent wind-eroded dusts contribute to.In a large-scale grass removal experiment (NEAT), we identified several important thresholds that impact the conversion of grasslands to shrublands. Between 75%% grass loss, aeolian transport increases dramatically, but carbon and nitrogen in windborne sediment display another threshold between 50%% grass loss (Li et al.

). Last month, Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory hosted a conference on dust in the climate system as part of the NOAA funded Abrupt Climate Change in a Warming World (ACCWW) project.

Most often, we think of dust simply as the stuff that accumulates on our windowsills, but those fine particles floating in the air play an important role in the global climate .